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Hausman Clients in the Press: April 2017

hausman-clients-press

The hits—in the media—just keep on coming for Hausman clients! Here’s a select list of articles that appeared in the month of April.

The New York Times  reports on Arup‘s improvements to a pedestrian bridge in Brooklyn

Arup weighs in on the viability of a self-printing skyscraper in Forbes

Building Design + Construction covers the Chrysalis concert pavilion, engineered by Arup; e-architect takes a look, too

The Oregon Business Journal does a deep dive into the design tech used by Behnisch Architekten in its new School of Business Administration at PSU

Portland Business Journal features Behnisch Architekten‘s design for Portland State University

The North American headquarters of Biotrial by Francis Cauffman appears in Architecture Lab

Gluckman Tang‘s design for the Prado is featured by Inexhibit

ArchDaily announces the Global Contemporary Art Museum by Gluckman Tang wins a 2017 American Architecture Award

Behind the Hedges reports that Gluckman Tang‘s pavilion housing the work of Walter De Maria has won an Architizer A+ award

Museums designed by Gluckman Tang are the focus of Architectural Digest‘s look at North Adams, MA

ArchDaily breaks the news that Gluckman Tang is a finalist for the Telluride Arts Center project

Fred Bernstein covers the Walter De Maria pavilion by Gluckman Tang for Interior Design magazine

Gluckman Tang‘s Walter De Maria project wins a 2017 AIANY award

Construction Dive talks with McKissack & McKissack‘s Charles Yetter about complex project management

Curbed Chicago takes a look—and another look—at 166 North Aberdeen by Solomon Cordwell Buenz

Solomon Cordwell Buenz transforms a historic Sears and Roebuck facility into apartments, reports The Architect’s Newspaper

The Chicago Maroon previews a new 28-story tower by Solomon Cordwell Buenz

On Michigan Avenue, Solomon Cordwell Buenz is set to break ground on a 47-story residential building, according to Construction Dive

Live Trading News announces a 25-story condo in Palm Beaches, Florida by Solomon Cordwell Buenz has secured construction financing

(More) Words of Wisdom

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Following up on last week’s roundup of prominent PR pros proffering advice to their younger selves, here’s entrepreneur Richard Branson’s take on the assignment. Writing to his 25-year-old self, he says:

Dear Richard,

I’m writing to you from 40 years in the future. You’re now 65 years old, and while you’ve lived a happy and healthy life with no regrets, I have some advice for you.

Congratulations on launching Virgin. I know you’re still trying to find your feet and work out the ins and outs of business, but stick with it. I can guarantee the best is yet to come. While I don’t want to spoil the mystery and fantasy of the unknown, I can tell you there will be so many wonderfully rewarding moments and the most incredible people in your future. And, yes, many of your wildest dreams will come true. But there’s a clause: you will have to work hard to make them happen.

The road ahead is pock-marked with many bumps, chasms, and forks. There will be times where you want to give up and throw everything in. Don’t. By turning challenges into opportunities, you will find success you never realized you were capable of achieving. But you won’t always succeed. In fact, you will fail time and time again. That’s OK, though, because failure is an inevitable part of every personal and entrepreneurial journey. It’s important to pick yourself up, retrace your steps, look at what went wrong, and learn from your mistakes.

“Entrepreneur”: now there’s a word that you might not be overly familiar with yet. But you will be. It’s a word that will become synonymous with your name and your approach to business. It’s also a word synonymous with risk. You took a risk when you left school to start Student magazine, and again when you moved from Student magazine to Virgin Records—and both paid off. Continue to take chances. In the future, how “lucky” you are in business will be determined by how willing you are to take calculated risks.

Let your dreams guide your path. Keep the people you love and respect close to you. Don’t be afraid to delegate responsibility. Don’t let the naysayers deter you. Screw business as usual and do things your own way. The Virgin brand will take you places other than music. Your ability to take calculated risks and your incurable optimism will lead to great heights—both in business and in life. Like one of your favorite authors, Dr. Seuss, wrote, “Oh, the Places You’ll Go!” Reach for the moon—it’s yours for the taking, if you go out there and grab for it with both hands.

Good luck—

Richard

Sir Richard also “corresponded” with himself at ages 10, 50, and 65.

Celebrating Women's History Month

Lisa Anders Headshot

In recognition of Women’s History Month, we’re asking leading practitioners to talk about what drew them to the AEC industries. Lisa Anders, Vice President of Business Development at McKissack & McKissack, has more than two decades of construction project management experience in both public and private sectors. Holding a BS in Civil Engineering from Howard University and a MBA from the University of Maryland, she was senior program director for the new National Museum of African American History and Culture and senior project manager for the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial.

“As a child I gravitated towards activities and toys that required creativity and assembly, like Lego, woodworking, and building model trains and rockets. I was into science and math, and loved art. I strongly considered going pre-med, but chose to pursue civil engineering instead because it seemed to capture all of my interests. Although I like the living sciences, I followed my passion of building things over rebuilding people! I have been thoroughly satisfied with my choice. It has been very rewarding, and I feel blessed to enjoy a career that contributes to the enhancement of the world in which we live.”

Hausman Clients in the Press: January 2017

hausman clients january press

The new year is off to a great start for Hausman, and we’d like to share some of last month’s editorial success stories! Here’s a select list of our architectural and engineering clients featured in the media during January.

The Arup-engineered Second Avenue Subway made headlines in Wired and in Wallpaper

The Atlantic looks at the upgrade of LAX; Arup‘s strategic aviation security expertise is highlighted

Behnisch Architekten‘s design for Harvard’s new Science and Engineering Complex is reviewed by Crain’s Boston

The Houston Chronicle tours the home of Dillon Kyle Architects founder and principal…and Chron.com visits, too

The North American headquarters of Biotrial, designed by Francis Cauffman, wins a design award from the American Institute of Architects’ New Jersey chapter

Gluckman Tang‘s proposal for the Museo del Prado is revealed in Masonry Design magazine

Architects + Artisans features Gluckman Tang‘s design for a summer house at Olana

The Olana project by Gluckman Tang was also spotlighted by The Huffington Post

The latest Crane Report by Rider Levett Bucknall was covered by The Architect’s Newspaper and National Real Estate Investor. Featured markets were picked up by many local media outlets, including the Charlotte Observer, Curbed LA, Nashville Business Journal, Pacific Business News, and the Seattle Times

The Architect’s Newspaper profiles Solomon Cordwell Buenz‘ newest contribution to the San Francisco skyline, 399 Fremont

SCB principal Gary Kohn shares his expertise in hospitality work in an article on Loews North Park Drive in Top Hotel News

Truth, Facts, and PR

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[Illustration from “Facts are Sacred” by Simon Rogers]

On January 24, 2017, the Public Relations Society of America issued a brief statement that we’d like to share:

PRSA Statement on “Alternative Facts”

Truth is the foundation of all effective communications. By being truthful, we build and maintain trust with the media and our customers, clients and employees. As professional communicators, we take very seriously our responsibility to communicate with honesty and accuracy.

The Public Relations Society of America, the nation’s largest communications association, sets the standard of ethical behavior for [our] 22,000 members through our Code of Ethics. Encouraging and perpetuating the use of alternative facts by a high-profile spokesperson reflects poorly on all communications professionals.

PRSA strongly objects to any effort to deliberately misrepresent information. Honest, ethical professionals never spin, mislead, or alter facts. We applaud our colleagues and professional journalists who work hard to find and report the truth.

—Jane Dvorak, APR, Fellow PRSA, Chair of the Society for 2017

Truth and integrity are at the heart of our practice at Hausman. We’re proud that for nearly a decade we have earned the trust of both our clients and journalists by delivering information and ideas that are fact-checked and objective.

Public Relations: A Resolution for 2017

 

public relations pr hausmanHiring a public relations agency is a positive, proactive step in building your brand and reaching the right audiences with your message. While most searches will start with the internet, don’t forget other sources for recommendations: professional organizations, colleagues, and even competitors will be able to offer suggestions on who to consider (and just as importantly, who to avoid). Once you’ve identified some potential PR firms to hire, it’s time to take a closer look at their qualifications:

People and practices. In a large part, you’ll be entrusting your business’ reputation to a public relations agency, so it’s key to have good chemistry with—and confidence in—its management and staff. Do some sleuthing, and check out their LinkedIn profiles and professional bios. Follow up with a face-to-face meeting, and find out who will work on your account and in what capacity.

Corporate culture. Will you be best served by working with a large PR firm, with a traditional organizational structure and resources? Or would you find a small, specialized shop that’s an upstart in the industry more in keeping with your own business style? Think about whether you want to be challenged—or complemented—by your public relations team.

Results. As with any hire, you’ll need to get and vet references for every public relations agency you are seriously considering. There are two sides to this: feedback from the firm’s current and former clients, and recognition by the PR industry. Ambitions are all well and good, but achievements are what counts.

Success Stories: Hausman Clients in the Press

While 2017 is officially upon us, before we close the books on 2016, we’d like to share some of last month’s editorial success stories. Here’s a select list of Hausman’s architectural and engineering clients in the December press.

Civil Engineering covers one of Arup‘s projects in Mexico City, Torre Reforma

Gluckman Tang‘s Extreme Model Railroad Museum in North Adams, MA made The Architect’s Newspaper

Deryl McKissack of McKissack & McKissack is profiled in Chicago Woman

SNAP (Sweets News and Products) quotes Dillon Kyle of Dillon Kyle Architects

Francis Cauffman is named to Architectural Record‘s list of top 300 architecture firms

Architecture critic Ed Gunts checks out Behnisch Architekten‘s Langsdale Library at the University of Baltimore

Healthcare Design recognizes excellence at Francis Cauffman

e-architect reviews the 2016 highpoints of Kevin Kennon Architects

W Architecture and Landscape Architecture and ROGERS PARTNERS Architects+Urban Designers are featured in Oculus magazine

Medical Dealer taps Francis Cauffman for insight on technology for radiology departments in hospitals

Success Stories: Hausman Clients in the Press

Screen Shot 2016-09-06 at 4.02.40 PMAs we hurtle towards the holidays, we pause to share some of last month’s success stories: a select list of Hausman’s clients in the November press.

San Francisco Business Times tours one of the most resilient tall buildings on the West Coast, featuring innovative seismic design by Arup

AGORA, a new cancer research center designed by Behnisch Architekten has broken ground; Inhabitat reports

Francis Cauffman wins award from the American Institute of Architects New Jersey chapter for its Biotrial North American headquarters project

PaperCity highlights a residence by Dillon Kyle Architects on this year’s AIA Houston Home Tour

Gluckman Tang‘s design for the expansion of the Museo del Prado is revealed by Dexigner

Medical Construction & Design introduces the director of healthcare projects at McKissack & McKissack

President of Joseph A. Natoli Construction named Man of the Year by the Boy Scouts of America Patriots’ Path Council

We're Thankful...

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…for the opportunity to work with amazing clients. And to review this list of selected editorial coverage during the month of October, it seems that many members of the media share our enthusiasm!

Architectural Products takes a look at Arup‘s work at the Samsung Device Solutions Americas Headquarters [pages 86-90]

A residence by Dillon Kyle Architects, featured on the recent Houston AIA Home Tour, is featured on Culture Map Houston

The Chicago Sun-Times talks with Deryl McKissack of McKissack & McKissack about the NMAAHC

Architectural Record examines the unique acoustics engineered by Arup at San Francisco LightHouse

AGORA, a new cancer research facility by Behnisch Architekten, is documented by Contract magazine

Francis Cauffman‘s New York Hotel Trades Council building was featured in this year’s Open House New York. CurbedNY has the scoop

The Real Estate Deal Sheet cites Rider Levett Bucknall‘s “US Q3 Quarterly Construction Cost Report”

Top of the Class: Award-Winning School Architecture

Earlier in this academically-oriented month, the AIA announced the recipients of its Committee on Architecture for Education awards. This year, the jury selected 12 educational facilities that met the criteria of “furthering the client’s mission, goals, and educational program while demonstrating excellence in architectural design.” Of that dozen, we’ve picked our five favorites.

 

mundo

Mundo Verde Bilingual Public Charter School, John F. Cook Campus

Studio Twenty Seven Architecture 

Washington, D.C.
Mundo Verde is a sustainability-focused school that consists of two buildings: the renewed historic school and a new pre-K annex. Within the older building, breakout nooks and cubbies are carved from the generous corridors and abandoned ventilation chases. New windows provide natural light to the building core. The façade of the pre-K annex is designed to be deferential to the historic school. A third floor learning terrace, large windows, and building orientation provide for light-filled classrooms which wrap around the natural landscape of the interior play court.

 

dwight

Dwight-Englewood School Hajjar STEM Center

Gensler

Englewood, New Jersey

The designers of this new building found inspiration in the integrative STEM curriculum as they created an adaptable facility that fosters a cross-disciplinary community. Inside, seven flexible classrooms and eight science labs center around a double-height community area that serves as an “innovation hub” where students are free to explore ideas and projects. Moveable furniture, audio-visual capabilities, and write-on surfaces encourage students to “hack” the space and shape their own learning process.

 

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Kennedy Child Study Center

Pell Overton Architects

New York, New York

In adapting a 1930s warehouse building, the design team faced a number of  challenges in the 25,000-square-foot space, including an unusually low ceiling and a lack of natural light. In response, a series of large, colorful lighting bays are cut into the otherwise smooth ceiling, creating the perception of greater height and illumination from above. To further relieve the compressed nature of the lower floor, administrative offices are arranged around two open work areas, providing visual access to new windows and allowing daylight to filter deeper into the space.

 

ivey

Richard Ivey School of Business, Western University

Hariri Pontarini Architects

London, Ontario, Canada

Echoing the architecture of the campus, a towering great hall anchors the entry lobby, with the dining hall, library, and amphitheater extending into the surrounding landscape as distinct pavilions. Designing from the inside out, the architects created spaces that support the school’s case-based and team learning pedagogy. The research-based design process involved numerous workshops and a survey of 60 top business schools. The building’s materials—stone, concrete, glass, copper, steel, walnut, and Douglas fir—were selected for their elemental and timeless qualities.

 

volwalker

Steven L. Anderson Design Center, University of Arkansas

Marlon Blackwell Architects; associate architect: Polk Stanley Wilcox Architects

Fayetteville, Arkansas

The addition provides 37,000 square feet of new studio, faculty offices, and seminar space as well as a 200-seat auditorium and an exhibition gallery. This project is a hybrid of a historic restoration and a contemporary insertion and expansion. Post-tensioned concrete and Indiana limestone honor the weight and substance of the original structures, while a frit-glass brise soleil and steel curtainwall create a contemporary figure. The overall design establishes a tangible discourse between past and present, while providing state of the art facilities for 21st century architectural and design education.

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