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Hausman Clients in the Press: April 2017

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The hits—in the media—just keep on coming for Hausman clients! Here’s a select list of articles that appeared in the month of April.

The New York Times  reports on Arup‘s improvements to a pedestrian bridge in Brooklyn

Arup weighs in on the viability of a self-printing skyscraper in Forbes

Building Design + Construction covers the Chrysalis concert pavilion, engineered by Arup; e-architect takes a look, too

The Oregon Business Journal does a deep dive into the design tech used by Behnisch Architekten in its new School of Business Administration at PSU

Portland Business Journal features Behnisch Architekten‘s design for Portland State University

The North American headquarters of Biotrial by Francis Cauffman appears in Architecture Lab

Gluckman Tang‘s design for the Prado is featured by Inexhibit

ArchDaily announces the Global Contemporary Art Museum by Gluckman Tang wins a 2017 American Architecture Award

Behind the Hedges reports that Gluckman Tang‘s pavilion housing the work of Walter De Maria has won an Architizer A+ award

Museums designed by Gluckman Tang are the focus of Architectural Digest‘s look at North Adams, MA

ArchDaily breaks the news that Gluckman Tang is a finalist for the Telluride Arts Center project

Fred Bernstein covers the Walter De Maria pavilion by Gluckman Tang for Interior Design magazine

Gluckman Tang‘s Walter De Maria project wins a 2017 AIANY award

Construction Dive talks with McKissack & McKissack‘s Charles Yetter about complex project management

Curbed Chicago takes a look—and another look—at 166 North Aberdeen by Solomon Cordwell Buenz

Solomon Cordwell Buenz transforms a historic Sears and Roebuck facility into apartments, reports The Architect’s Newspaper

The Chicago Maroon previews a new 28-story tower by Solomon Cordwell Buenz

On Michigan Avenue, Solomon Cordwell Buenz is set to break ground on a 47-story residential building, according to Construction Dive

Live Trading News announces a 25-story condo in Palm Beaches, Florida by Solomon Cordwell Buenz has secured construction financing

Hausman Clients in the Press: March 2017

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Read all about it! We’re proud to share these select clips of Hausman clients featured in the media during the month of March.

The Boston Globe tours Arup’s healthy Boston office

Arup engineers silence for an exhibit at the Guggenheim Museum, via The New York Times

Yahoo Finance covers the expansion of Arup in Houston

Arch20 visits the new John and Frances Angelos Law Center by Behnisch Architekten at the University of Baltimore

Matt Noblett of Behnisch Architekten talks to Architect magazine about the impact of budgets cuts to the EPA might affect the building industry

Retail Design features Francis Cauffman’s design for the offices of law firm Fox Rothschild

Gluckman Tang’s artful residential portfolio is showcased in Fred A. Bernstein’s article in Introspective magazine

McKissack & McKissack CEO Deryl McKissack is interviewed for The New York Times column, “Corner Office”

Mentorphile features Deryl McKissack, CEO of McKissack & McKissack

Rider Levett Bucknall’s inimitable “Crane Report” makes The Wall Street Journal

The Las Vegas Sun talks to Rider Levett Bucknall about financing sports stadium construction projects

Hausman Clients in the Press: February 2017

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We’re thrilled to be continuing our streak of great press for Hausman clients in 2017! Here’s a select list of editorial coverage culled from the month of February.

Engineering News-Record looks at Arup‘s visionary work in the transportation sector

Three major projects by Behnisch Architekten are featured in Arch20: WIPO Conference Hall, Harvard University’s Science and Engineering Complex in Allston, and Santa Monica Parking Structure #6

The AIA New York chapter notes the opening of the innovative Upstate Cord Blood Bank by Francis Cauffman. The project is also covered in Eagle News and NewsWise

Medical Construction & Design talks to Francis Cauffman about best practices in ER design

Francis Cauffman‘s design for New York law firm Fox Rothchild is profiled in Office Snapshots

Real Estate Weekly recognizes staff promotions at Francis Cauffman

Donna Wilson interviews Deryl McKissack of McKissack & McKissack in a three-part series for Bloomberg Radio

The Jobsite turns to Julian Anderson of Rider Levett Bucknall for construction business insight

John Jozwick of Rider Levett Bucknall advises on avoiding drive-by ADA lawsuits in Building Design + Construction

Hausman Clients in the Press: January 2017

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The new year is off to a great start for Hausman, and we’d like to share some of last month’s editorial success stories! Here’s a select list of our architectural and engineering clients featured in the media during January.

The Arup-engineered Second Avenue Subway made headlines in Wired and in Wallpaper

The Atlantic looks at the upgrade of LAX; Arup‘s strategic aviation security expertise is highlighted

Behnisch Architekten‘s design for Harvard’s new Science and Engineering Complex is reviewed by Crain’s Boston

The Houston Chronicle tours the home of Dillon Kyle Architects founder and principal…and Chron.com visits, too

The North American headquarters of Biotrial, designed by Francis Cauffman, wins a design award from the American Institute of Architects’ New Jersey chapter

Gluckman Tang‘s proposal for the Museo del Prado is revealed in Masonry Design magazine

Architects + Artisans features Gluckman Tang‘s design for a summer house at Olana

The Olana project by Gluckman Tang was also spotlighted by The Huffington Post

The latest Crane Report by Rider Levett Bucknall was covered by The Architect’s Newspaper and National Real Estate Investor. Featured markets were picked up by many local media outlets, including the Charlotte Observer, Curbed LA, Nashville Business Journal, Pacific Business News, and the Seattle Times

The Architect’s Newspaper profiles Solomon Cordwell Buenz‘ newest contribution to the San Francisco skyline, 399 Fremont

SCB principal Gary Kohn shares his expertise in hospitality work in an article on Loews North Park Drive in Top Hotel News

A Quick PR Quiz for AEC Professionals

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To help you perfect your communications strategy in 2017, we’ve put together a pop PR quiz highlighting some common misconceptions about public relations. How do you think you’ll score?

True or False: Use as many social media platforms as possible to promote your projects

FALSE. It may be tempting to set up as many profiles as possible in the hopes of reaching the widest audience, but it’s more effective to selectively choose the channels that will reach your target audiences. For example, image-centric Instagram is ideal for showing your firm’s creativity through photographs; more text-heavy postings on LinkedIn will connect with executives. Remember “Less is more”: It’s the way you use your social media platforms that matters, not how many you use.

True or False: Designing a great building means your firm will get noticed immediately

FALSE. Your latest project may be the best work your firm has ever done, but that doesn’t guarantee that you will get top press coverage overnight. Quality editorial requires solid strategy. Developing an effective PR campaign for your firm and projects takes time. Getting the word out about your work should start long before the project is finished, so it is helpful to establish a schedule for all press related activities. Update your social media regularly with photos of the project to alert the press to construction milestones.

True or False: If an editor doesn’t answer your follow up about a project, it’s helpful to reach out again

TRUE. If an editor hasn’t responded to your follow up about your latest project, it doesn’t automatically mean they’re not interested. The key to grabbing an editor’s attention is to find new ways of pitching your project; don’t just repeat the content of your last email. Tip: Keep your emails concise. Make the most important information easy to find by putting it in the first few sentences, or use bullet points to call out key ideas.

True or False: Social media is impersonal and time consuming

FALSE. Social media offers a great advantage in showcasing your firm’s personality by providing a “behind the scenes” look at your firm and its work. You can offer brief, personable updates that don’t need to follow the formalities of press releases. Updating your accounts daily or a few times a week takes only a couple minutes, and can help keep your firm’s name top-of-mind with clients and target audiences.

True or False: Developing relationships with the media is not as important as sending out lots of press releases

FALSE. To create meaningful exposure for your projects, quality content is essential, not the number of press releases you send out. It’s important to keep in mind that while reporters might not cover a story the first time you pitch to them, maintaining regular contact with them can help lead to an exclusive story down the line. That’s why building a professional network of media contacts is critical. By establishing a solid rapport with an editor, it will increase the odds that he or she will remember you the next time they’re looking for a story on a specific type of project.

Success Stories: Hausman Clients in the Press

While 2017 is officially upon us, before we close the books on 2016, we’d like to share some of last month’s editorial success stories. Here’s a select list of Hausman’s architectural and engineering clients in the December press.

Civil Engineering covers one of Arup‘s projects in Mexico City, Torre Reforma

Gluckman Tang‘s Extreme Model Railroad Museum in North Adams, MA made The Architect’s Newspaper

Deryl McKissack of McKissack & McKissack is profiled in Chicago Woman

SNAP (Sweets News and Products) quotes Dillon Kyle of Dillon Kyle Architects

Francis Cauffman is named to Architectural Record‘s list of top 300 architecture firms

Architecture critic Ed Gunts checks out Behnisch Architekten‘s Langsdale Library at the University of Baltimore

Healthcare Design recognizes excellence at Francis Cauffman

e-architect reviews the 2016 highpoints of Kevin Kennon Architects

W Architecture and Landscape Architecture and ROGERS PARTNERS Architects+Urban Designers are featured in Oculus magazine

Medical Dealer taps Francis Cauffman for insight on technology for radiology departments in hospitals

Welcome Back

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Back to school, back to work—September is the time we begin to reconnect with the various responsibilities of our lives, after (hopefully) enjoying the less-demanding pace of the mid-year. Before we completely surrender summer, here’s a selective list of coverage Hausman clients received in August. Next week, we’ll delve into educational opportunities offered by architecture and design schools.

Architectural Digest reports on Torre Reforma, Arup‘s new project in Mexico City

A rule-breaking home by Dillon Kyle Architects is toured by Houzz

YIMBY New York checks on the progress of Francis Cauffman‘s healthcare center in Brooklyn

Museo Picasso Málaga by Gluckman Tang is cited by Metropolis as one of the best interiors of the 21st century

Visual Merchandising and Store Design visits the Panama City branch of luxury retailer Felix by Kevin Kennon Architects

W Architecture and Landscape Architecture‘s dynamic St. Patrick’s Island is profiled by Parks and Rec Business

Drone Videos: Touring a Building Without Leaving Your Desk

The best way to capture the “feel” of a building is by experiencing it in person—stepping inside lets you appreciate the building’s size, as well as light, air movement, and other intangibles. But sometimes an in-person tour isn’t possible due to constraints of geography, budget, or time.

At Legacy Building Solutions, we have found drone videos to be an effective tool to help potential customers understand fabric structures. Drone video footage allows viewers to experience the reality of a building in a way that words and still photos can’t convey.

One advantage of drone video footage is the ability to depict scale with accuracy. Video of an aircraft assembly hangar quickly shows how people and vehicles are dwarfed by the fabric structure. The aerial footage also reveals a feature that an on-site visitor wouldn’t be able to see: the rooftop solar panels. And while at this shoot, falling snow posed some difficulties for the drone operator, it served to dramatically delineate the difference between the inside and outside environments.

Video of an indoor tennis center shows how the building’s design complements the existing outdoor tennis courts and the surrounding area. The interior footage captures the way lights inside the building reflect off the walls’ inside liner, a concept that’s difficult to explain without a visual aid. Tennis enthusiasts can see how six courts fit inside the structure with room to spare.

By capturing workers in a manufacturing environment as well as an office setting, the drone footage of Legacy’s headquarters shows the versatility of the buildings. This video also depicts heavy equipment, such as overhead cranes, and architectural features, such as the outside canopy, attached to the building frame.

When the potential client can’t come to the building, using a drone video might be the best way to bring the building to them. —Juliet Brambrink, MarComm Administrator, Legacy Building Solutions

Architecture & Design Film Festival – Kyle Bergman Q+A

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Here in New York City, it’s Architecture and Design Month “Archtober” (ärk’tōbər)! It’s the fifth annual month-long festival of architecture activities, programs and exhibitions taking place during the month of October.  Around the globe, there are a bounty of cultural festivals that also celebrate excellent architecture and great design and, this month, we’re highlighting some of the world’s best. Let’s start here at home in NYC with the Architecture & Design Film Festival… 

 

Now, in its seventh year, the Architecture & Design Film Festival returns to New York, October 13 -18, with an invigorating selection of feature-length, short, and documentary films. Expect to be engaged and entertained by lively discussions with architects, designers, filmmakers and industry leaders. We caught up with Kyle Bergman, the founder and director of the Architecture & Design Film Festival.

 

Q: How did the festival get started?

A: I’m an architect by profession and I’ve always thought about the great connection between architecture and film. To me, they’re two sides of the same coin — architecture and film are ways for us to tell stories. They share similar characteristics, for one, they are both public acts. Both art forms consider light, scale, proportion, and it’s really a balance between art and science. Merging architecture and film was something that came natural to me. I really wanted to develop a film festival that engaged the general public as well as the design community.

 

Q: What is the film selection process?

A: We accept submissions year-round. We preview around 250 films and try to stick to a schedule of 25-30 films. However, this year we ended up with a selection of 33 films, which speaks volumes about the high caliber of submissions we received. Our selection process is “organic”, and we don’t adhere to criteria; we care more about how the films capture the creative design process.

 

Q: Were there themes that came together in making selections for this year’s programs?

A: No, we don’t start with themes, it generally evolves. But a Nordic theme became apparent when we were finalizing our program schedule. For instance, we’re showing Jytte Rex’s acclaimed portrait of the late Henning Larsen, and The Infinite Happiness, which features the giant 8 House designed by Bjarke Ingels. Festivalgoers may even detect mini-Irish and family themes.

 

Q: Can you describe the physical and emotional duress of putting on a festival like this?

A: I may disappoint you with my answer… I’m a firm believer that if you like what you do, you don’t even think about it.

 

Q: Tell us the best and worst part of your job.

A: The festival is something that I started, so I’m proud of that. But I would say the best part of my job is having the opportunity to increase architecture and design dialogue, and make it more appealing to a wider audience, not just for design professionals. Then, there are the filmmakers…I feel that the festival puts a spotlight on these talented filmmakers and showcases their passion and dedication to their craft.

 

Don’t miss out on the nation’s largest film festival celebrating architecture and design. Tickets and the program schedule are available here.

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