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Hausman Clients in the Press: February 2017

hausman-clients-press-february-2017

We’re thrilled to be continuing our streak of great press for Hausman clients in 2017! Here’s a select list of editorial coverage culled from the month of February.

Engineering News-Record looks at Arup‘s visionary work in the transportation sector

Three major projects by Behnisch Architekten are featured in Arch20: WIPO Conference Hall, Harvard University’s Science and Engineering Complex in Allston, and Santa Monica Parking Structure #6

The AIA New York chapter notes the opening of the innovative Upstate Cord Blood Bank by Francis Cauffman. The project is also covered in Eagle News and NewsWise

Medical Construction & Design talks to Francis Cauffman about best practices in ER design

Francis Cauffman‘s design for New York law firm Fox Rothchild is profiled in Office Snapshots

Real Estate Weekly recognizes staff promotions at Francis Cauffman

Donna Wilson interviews Deryl McKissack of McKissack & McKissack in a three-part series for Bloomberg Radio

The Jobsite turns to Julian Anderson of Rider Levett Bucknall for construction business insight

John Jozwick of Rider Levett Bucknall advises on avoiding drive-by ADA lawsuits in Building Design + Construction

Anatomy of a Haunted House: Frightening Facades

addams-family-house

There’s a design formula to the traditional haunted house. Among the hallmarks of horror:

A Historic Pedigree. Gothic, of course, is the go-to architectural style for scares, but a spare, blank-windowed farmhouse can also induce apprehension. And the notorious Amityville Horror home was a mild-mannered Dutch colonial.

Fearsome Features. Turrets, towers, and wrap-around porches are all specter-worthy settings. Leaded- or stained-glass windows—cobwebs are optional, but a nice touch—frame blood moons quite well.

The No-Maintenance Look. While crumbling staircases, broken or boarded-up windows, and peeling roof shingles may be a handyman’s nightmare, such decrepit details heighten the impression that a house has been abandoned to the spirits.

 

The contemporary buildings featured in this post display none of these classic traits, but have some disturbing qualities nonetheless. Their foreboding facades—some evoking mechanical torture chambers, others with a ghostly or skeletal character—might deter even die-hard trick-or-treaters.

ghost-house-french-artist

Of their transformation of a former prison/school/funeral home, artist-architects Christophe Berdaguer and Marie Péjus state, “To us, architecture is a space for imaginative possibilities, for telling stories to ourselves and others. It is above all a collective dream, that of a community of people and ghosts.”

 

house-77-by-dioniso-lab

House 77 was designed by dIONISO Lab. Stainless steel shutters covering the front of the building are perforated with cryptic symbols. These siglas poveiras are part of a proto-writing system that has been used by the inhabitants of Póvoa de Varzim, Portugal for many generations. Typically inscribed in wood or stone, they are used to signify family histories, identify property, and are also used as magical-religious marks.

 

ghost-facades

Meticulous Photoshopping is behind [ahem] the work of French photographer Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy. He says, “This series of photographs offers a vision of an unknown world that would only be a picture, without intimate space, with looks as the only refuge.”

 

Photo: Yao Li

As part of the China International Practical Exhibition of Architecture, the Number Four House by AZL Architects sits in an isolated valley. Much as a traditional Chinese scroll reveals select segments of its content, the horizontal breaks in the building’s contoured concrete facade control the views of the surrounding terrain.

 

r-are-net

Rare Architects wrapped a laser-cut scrim made of powder-coated aluminum around the Town Hall Hotel in London, an adaptive reuse project. It acts as a phantasm of sorts, blurring the boundaries between architectural eras and places, an apparition in the streetscape.

Top of the Class: Award-Winning School Architecture

Earlier in this academically-oriented month, the AIA announced the recipients of its Committee on Architecture for Education awards. This year, the jury selected 12 educational facilities that met the criteria of “furthering the client’s mission, goals, and educational program while demonstrating excellence in architectural design.” Of that dozen, we’ve picked our five favorites.

 

mundo

Mundo Verde Bilingual Public Charter School, John F. Cook Campus

Studio Twenty Seven Architecture 

Washington, D.C.
Mundo Verde is a sustainability-focused school that consists of two buildings: the renewed historic school and a new pre-K annex. Within the older building, breakout nooks and cubbies are carved from the generous corridors and abandoned ventilation chases. New windows provide natural light to the building core. The façade of the pre-K annex is designed to be deferential to the historic school. A third floor learning terrace, large windows, and building orientation provide for light-filled classrooms which wrap around the natural landscape of the interior play court.

 

dwight

Dwight-Englewood School Hajjar STEM Center

Gensler

Englewood, New Jersey

The designers of this new building found inspiration in the integrative STEM curriculum as they created an adaptable facility that fosters a cross-disciplinary community. Inside, seven flexible classrooms and eight science labs center around a double-height community area that serves as an “innovation hub” where students are free to explore ideas and projects. Moveable furniture, audio-visual capabilities, and write-on surfaces encourage students to “hack” the space and shape their own learning process.

 

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Kennedy Child Study Center

Pell Overton Architects

New York, New York

In adapting a 1930s warehouse building, the design team faced a number of  challenges in the 25,000-square-foot space, including an unusually low ceiling and a lack of natural light. In response, a series of large, colorful lighting bays are cut into the otherwise smooth ceiling, creating the perception of greater height and illumination from above. To further relieve the compressed nature of the lower floor, administrative offices are arranged around two open work areas, providing visual access to new windows and allowing daylight to filter deeper into the space.

 

ivey

Richard Ivey School of Business, Western University

Hariri Pontarini Architects

London, Ontario, Canada

Echoing the architecture of the campus, a towering great hall anchors the entry lobby, with the dining hall, library, and amphitheater extending into the surrounding landscape as distinct pavilions. Designing from the inside out, the architects created spaces that support the school’s case-based and team learning pedagogy. The research-based design process involved numerous workshops and a survey of 60 top business schools. The building’s materials—stone, concrete, glass, copper, steel, walnut, and Douglas fir—were selected for their elemental and timeless qualities.

 

volwalker

Steven L. Anderson Design Center, University of Arkansas

Marlon Blackwell Architects; associate architect: Polk Stanley Wilcox Architects

Fayetteville, Arkansas

The addition provides 37,000 square feet of new studio, faculty offices, and seminar space as well as a 200-seat auditorium and an exhibition gallery. This project is a hybrid of a historic restoration and a contemporary insertion and expansion. Post-tensioned concrete and Indiana limestone honor the weight and substance of the original structures, while a frit-glass brise soleil and steel curtainwall create a contemporary figure. The overall design establishes a tangible discourse between past and present, while providing state of the art facilities for 21st century architectural and design education.

High Marks: Architecture on Campus

Time again for pencils, books, and teachers’ dirty looks: School’s back in session. Several of Hausman‘s clients have made recent and future contributions to campuses around the world; here’s a look at a few of these projects.

arup-bergeron-ctr

Arup

York University, Bergeron Center of Engineering Excellence

Toronto, Canada

Providing structural, mechanical, electrical, and civil engineering services, Arup delivered this project by BIM, streamlining a process that would usually take two weeks to three days. Designed by ZAS Architects, the building is dedicated to creating “renaissance engineers” through a multidisciplinary curriculum and integrating learning with industry and the global engineering community.

 

behnisch-portland

Behnisch Architekten

Portland State University, School of Business Administration

Portland, Oregon

Located in close proximity to downtown Portland, this school is positioned to integrate with the city’s rich network of public open space and diverse urban uses. Rejecting the single-building construction that dominates the 200′ x 200′ street grid, the design for the 135,000-square-foot structure appears as two distinct buildings sharing a city block. This approach enhances the public realm by providing a more diverse streetscape, reinvigorating existing links, and creating new arteries between the urban center and its related pedestrian paths, transportation routes, and parks.

 

dillon-kyle

Dillon Kyle Architects

Emery/Weiner School

Houston, Texas

This outdoor pavilion serves both symbolic and physical purposes. Sited at the crossroads between the middle and high school campuses, the pavilion is inspired by the sukkah, a temporary structure that is used in the Jewish Festival of Sukkot. Jewish tradition holds that a sukkah must have at least 2 1/2 sides and be open to the sky. The pavilion is used by the school for the sukkah ritual, but also serves an everyday purpose as a place for students to come together for learning, eating, school performances or casual interactions. The materials are tied to the architecture of the school; a limestone base forms informal seating and aluminum forms the pergola-like armature. Similar to classic Greek amphitheaters, a berm visually grounds the structure on the otherwise flat landscape. Creating this topography also amplifies the pavilion’s monumental nature as a central focus, both symbolically and physically, for the campus.

 

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Gluckman Tang

Korman Center, Drexel University

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

“Our design aspires to give new life to the public face of the Korman Center by projecting openness and transparency and creating dynamic, day-lit interior spaces that connect with an active front porch on the Korman Quad,” says Dana Tang, partner at Gluckman Tang Architects. Renovations planned for the 1958 structure call for the addition of a 9,000-square-foot solarium at the entrance that will serve as a two-story lobby and community space. There will be a cantilevered terra-cotta screen that will serve to protect the interiors from solar heat gain. The classrooms will also undergo makeovers.

 

natoli-rutgers-inst-for-food

Joseph A. Natoli Construction

Rutgers University; Institute of Food, Nutrition, and Health

New Brunswick, New Jersey

The three-story, 80,000-sf facility houses 25 principal investigators researching genomics and molecular nutrition. The $34-million project includes 37,198 square feet of research space, 825 square feet of administration area, and 28,263 square feet of community space. The remaining 13,425 square feet are occupied by mechanical systems and circulation areas. Related site improvements include utility extensions and relocations, building support, and service access.

An Olympic Review: Record-Setting Architecture

The Rio games may be over, but we’re happy to help wean sports fans off their recent diet of swimming, gymnastics, and track and field [to say nothing of badminton and water polo], with a survey of some memorable Olympic architecture.

 

Rio Golf

Golf Venue

Rio de Janeiro 2016

Rua Arquitetos

Golf is a sport of precision and balance, and the design of this complex reflects those qualities. Locker rooms, lobbies, pro shop, and administration areas are located in small, low buildings around a courtyard, with views opening to the course beyond. The translucent fabric roof over the plaza funnels rainwater into a collection tank; the water is used for grounds maintenance.

 

Zaha London

Aquatics Centre

London 2012

Zaha Hadid

The concept for this building was inspired by the fluid geometry of water in motion, creating spaces and a surrounding environment in sympathy with the riverside landscape of the Olympic Park. An undulating roof sweeps up from the ground as a wave, enclosing the pools of the Centre with its unifying gesture. After the Olympics, the facility was downsized: the wings were lopped off, and seating capacity reduced from 17,500 to about 2,500.

 

montreal-olympic-stadium

Olympic Stadium

Montreal 1976

Roger Taillibert

The architect was fired from the job in mid-construction; that’s just the first salvo in a fusillade of failures for this stadium. More than a decade after the games were over, the retractable roof was finally completed in 1987; functionally deficient, it was removed in 1998 and replaced by a fixed roof. The 575-foot tower element of the stadium contains a funicular, which runs up to an observatory. The 56,000-seat stadium was used for several years for professional baseball and football games; today, the deteriorating structure is infrequently used as an events venue.

 

Olympic_Shooting_magma architectureHuftonCrow

Shooting Venue

London 2012

Magma Architecture

Through its dynamic, curving walls, the design of this venue evokes the flow and precision inherent in competitive shooting. Three buildings sport crisp, white double-curved façades studded with brightly colored circular openings, which act as ventilation intake portals. They also function as tensioning rings, keeping the PVC-fabric façades from flapping in the wind. After the Olympics, the buildings were dismantled—as intended—flat-packed, and shipped to other sites for use.

Five Weekend Diversions for Architects and Designers

If your summer days aren’t quite as lazy as you’d like, and taking a full-fledged vacation is not in the picture, don’t worry—we’ve compiled a short list of simple day-trip destinations that can refresh you just as much as a week on the beach. All of our suggested sites are homes and/or studios of artists, so you can tap into the creative vibe and further your own artistic interests during your visit—kind of a busman’s holiday.

 

manitoga russell wright

Manitoga

Garrison, New York

Overlooking a water-filled quarry in the Hudson River Highlands, mid-century designer Russell Wright created the interiors for his home and studio; David Leavitt was the architect for the house, which was built in 1960. Trails wind through the 75-acre woodland garden. A program of music performances and art installations continues throughout the summer; guided tours are offered May through November.

 

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Georgia O’Keeffe Home and Studio

Abiquiu, New Mexico

This adobe compound was in a ruined state when Georgia O’Keeffe’s first visited the property in 1945. After a four renovation, she moved into home and converted a stable into her studio; she lived there until 1984. About 50 miles from Santa Fe, the property is open for tours from March through November.

 

 

grant wood

Grant Wood Studio

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Grant Wood painted American Gothic in this studio in 1930. Located on the second floor of a modest 19th century brick carriage house, he remodeled the raw loft, creating an unexpectedly interesting and space-efficient live/work home. The building is open for visits from April through December.

 

The Benton Carriage House

Thomas Hart Benton Home and Studio

Kansas City, Missouri

The humble-yet-heroic paintings and murals of Thomas Hart Benton offer a powerful look at American life in the 1930s, with the people and culture of the Midwest his most frequent subject. The artist worked in this studio for 35 years, until his death in 1975. The property is open from April through November.

Away From It All

July is the month when vacation season starts in earnest. Temperatures climb, work weeks shorten (if you’re lucky), and the beach beckons. We’ve rounded up some architecturally auspicious summer homes by the shore (perhaps you’ll recognize a few of them) where we’d be very happy to while away a few days.

 

1 arango_house_lautner

Designed by John Lautner in 1970, the Arango House still has an avant-garde appeal. Overlooking Acapulco Bay, its solid, swooping forms handily defy easy categorization.

 

2 Brighton Beach

A vivid bit of vernacular design, the photogenic “beach boxes” of Australia’s Brighton Beach are an architectural inheritance of sorts, passed from one generation to the next. When one of these colorful cabanas does come on the market, the asking price—around $200,000 AUD—belies its size.

 

3 cooper_hse_gwathmey_siegel_architecture_hausman

Photograph by Bill Maris

An instant icon when it was built on Cape Cod in 1968, the Cooper House by Gwathmey-Siegel featured a peace-keeping program: the childrens’ bedrooms were separated from the parents’ master suite.

 

4 f2architecture.com.au 1

Photograph by Matt Lord

Clever photography and superlative engineering imbue this home, the Pole House Fairhaven by f2 Architecture, with the illusion of floating over the Australian coast.

 

5 garves_malibu_architecture_hausman

Post-modernism is having something of a moment, now, so we’re including this Malibu beach house by Michael Graves on our list of seaside retreats.

 

7 vault_hse_johnston_marklee_architecture_hausman

North of LA in Oxnard, the Vault House overlooks the Pacific. Architects Johnston Marklee designed the geometric exploration in 2013.

 

8 Norton Gehry Architecture Hausman

Frank Gehry‘s Norton House has been a landmark on the Venice, California boardwalk since 1984. The “lifeguard tower” structure, inspired by the homeowner’s erstwhile summer job, is used as a writer’s studio.

 

9 jeffreydungan_alys bch_architecture_hausman

Moorish meets Moderne in this spirited stylistic hybrid. In Alys Beach, not far from the epicenter of New Urbanism, Seaside, Florida, it’s designed by Jeffrey Dungan Architects.

 

10 mackay lyons two hulls architecture hausman

Reaching out over the waters of Canada, the Two Hulls House illustrates MacKay-Lyons-Sweetapple Architects’ continuing interest in pared-down forms set in a primordial landscape.

 

11 meier_malibu_architecture_hausman

At this Malibu residence, Richard Meier forgoes his traditional white facade in favor of a slatted screen of wood. How very Cali.

 

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The harbinger of a Bay Area regional style, Condominium 1 at The Sea Ranch was not initially well received by its developers, who sent a terse telegram—”Stop work. It looks like a prison.”—to architects Charles Moore, Donlyn Lyndon, Bill Turnbull, and Richard Whitaker in 1965.

Architecture in Bloom

In an extension—logical or otherwise—of last week’s post on green architecture, today we’re taking a look at buildings that cite nature as a design influence, as well as at a few structures whose purpose is to provide shelter for collections of exotic fauna.

 

safdie2 lotus

An abstracted lotus blossom gives form to the ArtScience Musuem in Singapore by Moishe Safdie.

 

studio505-lotus bldg

At the other end of the design spectrum, 505 Studio‘s Lotus Building in Wujin, China offers a slightly more representational visage.

 

lotus-temple-delhi

Built in 1986 in New Dehli, the Lotus Temple by Fariborz Sahba conforms to the Bahá’í precept requiring religious structures to have a plan based on a nine-pointed star.

 

rawlings

Turning from architectural metaphors to buildings actually designed for botanicals, we have the Howard P. Rawlings Conservatory in Baltimore. Opened in 1888, it’s the second oldest glass-and-steel-framed structure still in use in the US.

 

palmenhaus-schoenbrunn

On the grounds of Schönbrunn Palace in Vienna, Franz Segenschmid designed the Palm House in 1882. The glazing was largely destroyed during World War II; following five years of reconstruction, the building reopened in 1953.

 

jewelbox st louis

A curious bit of Art Deco in St. Louis, MO, the Jewel Box greenhouse was designed by city engineer William C.E. Becker. Built in 1936, the project was largely funded by the WPA. A 2002 renovation included new HVAC systems.

 

adelaide-botanic-gardens-rainforest-house

In Adelaide, Australia, the Bicentennial Conservatory was designed by Guy Maron in 1988. The curved structural steel and the aluminum-framed glazing units were prefabricated, then assembled on site.

Going for the Green

The showers of April have continued—all too vigorously, for some tastes—into May. While this soggy state of affairs can dampen the human spirit, it’s great weather for green architecture. Here’s a mix of built and conceptual projects that we find particularly uplifting on rainy spring days.

 

henning larsen moesgaard

The Moesgaard Museum by Henning Larsen Architects features a green roof that insulates the interior while shielding objects on display from direct sunlight.

 

1:c

A cell-like construction system is at the heart of the Re-Generator Skyscraper, a proposal by Gabriel Munoz Moreno to revive the wetlands of Hangzhou, China.

 

Prudential-green-wall-w-architecture

W Architecture and Landscape Architecture created a 32-foot by 55-foot green wall at the Prudential headquarters in Newark, New Jersey.

 

stadel museum

A green grid of circular skylights at the Stadel Museum in Frankfurt, Germany forms the “roof” of the underground expansion of the galleries, designed by Schneider + Schumacher.

 

espace bienvenue

Environmental scientists at Espace Bienvenue enjoy the view of a rooftop garden designed by Jean-Philippe Pargade.

 

olfen-bureau-baubotanik

Baubotanik utilizes living plants as the load-bearing systems in small constructions such as pavilions, towers, and walls. For architects accustomed to wielding complete control over a project, the serendipity of working with natural forces could be a bit challenging.

 

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Developed by Arup, a proposal for the eco-city of Wanzhuang, China explores a situating a cluster of villages around a shared town center as a solution for the country’s urban-rural gap.

 

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To mark the upcoming 50th anniversary of Expo 67 and Buckminster Fuller’s Biosphere, Studio Dror envisions a companion dome, netted with vegetation, on Montreal’s St. Helen’s Island.

Meaningful Contributions

flw

 

It’s April, and thoughts turn to taxes—and charitable giving. While it’s too late to reap the benefits of a deduction to eligible organizations in the current filing season, supporting worthy causes throughout 2016 will pay off in both fiscal and feel-good ways. Here, we share a few design-oriented non-profit entities that are deserving of recognition. FLW would approve.

 

Design Industries Foundation Fighting AIDS (DIFFA) is one of the country’s largest supporters of direct care for people living with HIV/AIDS and preventive education for those at risk. Merging care and commerce, supporters of DIFFA come from all fields of fine design and the visual arts, including architecture, fashion design, interior design, photography, and consumer product design.

With fundraising efforts bolstered by strategic partnerships and unique events showcasing innovation and creativity, DIFFA has mobilized the immense resources of the design communities and granted over $41 million to hundreds of AIDS service organizations nationwide.

Founded in 1984, DIFFA grants funds to organizations which fight AIDS by providing preventive education programs targeted to populations at risk of infection, treatment and direct-care services for people living with HIV/AIDS, and public policy initiatives which add resources to private sector efforts.

 

The International Committee for Documentation and Conservation of Buildings, Sites, and Neighborhoods of the Modern Movement (DOCOMOMO) promotes the study, interpretation and protection of the architecture, landscape and urban design of the Modern Movement. It promotes the exchange of knowledge about this important legacy which extends from the planned city and the iconic monument to the house next door.

Docomomo is an international organization, with chapters in 69 countries. It is an important presence in conservation and in architectural culture, worldwide, working in partnership with other international organizations, national governments, and regional and national associations.

The United States branch is organized in regional chapters and friend organizations throughout the country, from east coast to west coast and from the Gulf of Mexico to Minnesota. Chapters sponsor educational programs and tours, provide technical assistance on the preservation of Modern Movement buildings, conduct research and surveys that support a nationwide register, publish newsletters, and advocate for threatened sites.

 

The Urban Design Forum comprises leading developers, architects, planners, builders, public officials, scholars, lawyers, and journalists that have demonstrated a commitment to building great cities. Founded in 1979, and headquartered in New York, Fellows of the Forum hail from over fifty cities across the United States and around the world.

The Board of Directors invites a select group of distinguished leaders of urban design, planning and development to participate each year. Candidates are nominated for their significant contributions to the fields of urban design, planning and development; standing among his or her peers; and ability to participate actively in Forum programs.

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